redwoodcones
This site refers to the three types of Redwood by the names commonly used in the U.K:
Giant Redwood Giant Redwood / Giant Sequoia / Wellingtonia Sequoiadendron giganteum
Coast Redwood Coast Redwood / Redwood Sequoia sempervirens
Dawn Redwood Dawn Redwood Metasequoia glyptostroboides
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Twigger (Readers' Emails)
Most emails to the Redwood World website are to inform about new locations of Redwood trees or they are enquiries about their care. This page is for those emails that don't fall into the these categories, it is for items that other people might find interesting or helpful.
Forget Twitter, this is Twigger!

I do not publish any correspondence without first gaining approval from the person concerned.
July 2015: James Hilley from Scotland is keen to find a Redwood project.

To contact James please email: jameshilley01 @ yahoo.co.uk (remove the spaces)

"I'm interested in any long term projects about planting sequoia trees in Scotland. Any feedback about seedlings, ideal terrain and general advice would be welcome.

June 2015: James Cleaver from Norfolk wrote about a Redwood Legacy Woodland

" I would like to plant a Redwood woodland nearby to create natural heritage, engage local community, leave a positive legacy and do my bit for climate change. Are there any others out there that have the same idea?"

If you are able to support James in his venture in any way please click on his poster for contact details.

Legacy Woodland poster

June 2015: Alison Kibbey from California, U.S.A. sent us some hints and tips on growing Coast Redwoods

" I have a family background with redwoods and have studied them and worked with them most of my life. I was so delighted to see them in the UK, and then to find so many over the years.

After a fire my folks made a hedge of Coast Redwoods. It grew quickly and filled out. We placed them about 2.5-3.5m apart, and we capped them every three or four years once they reached 4.5m to maintain neighbors view (dispelling the idea you can't cap them. But if you cap a more mature tree, for overhead wires for instance, cutting a tree top that is 12m and you lop a lot off say 4.5m, that can kill the tree, although might not, they survive lightening strikes and forest neighbor falls as shown on your site.)

California is obviously in a drought and I've seen the red spotting you show in Giant Redwoods, in Coast Redwoods in my yard. It is fungal, but can come with under-watering as well. All diseases are opportunistic. Drought stresses redwoods faster and more than over-watering.

A little ground raw salmon is also a decent food for Coast Redwoods - their natural historic fertilizer - bears bring them up, they leave bits behind, trees take it in. Tucking the salmon in under mulch covers the smell.

Just an opinion, the woman with the redwood in the small yard is fighting the very nature of the redwood. Grow big, grow fast! My folks have redwoods they planted 50+ years ago lining their yard. The trunks are up to 1.8m in diameter, and between 20-28m tall. She can "box" the tree (I would do this with a new tree, they can take a beating, but not to their roots.) If she starts over and sinks a very large cement box with walls at least .15m thick to contain the roots, she will in effect create a bonzai-like redwood (bottom open for taproot.) It will grow, but she'll limit the span and therefore the height. It will be a little stressed and I wouldn't expect it to reach a great age, but you never know.

Growing from seed - ziplock bags! I collect the cones in bags, bring home and refrigerate in darkness for a short period. Then, keeping the cones in the bag, place in the sun, and the heat pops the seeds out. Then I take the healthy looking seeds put them spaced about 1.5 inches apart on a paper towel. Put the towel in a gallon size ziplock, wet the towel so it's thoroughly moist. Seal bag almost, then blow until the bag looks like a pillow and seal. Your trees first breath will be one of yours! Place bag in partial to full sun, without letting them cook. The ones that make it I plant in paper pots when they're between 1-2" and keep in a tray and water about a table spoon each morning. I transfer them to a wide pot when they take, and keep them close to the house with only morning sun, protected from bright sun until about 5 years old.

To deal with frost on young ones: Water roots well, a lot of water is less likely to freeze. If it's a light frost, spray tree with water. The mist on the surface will freeze and insulate the tree from frostbite. If it's going to be a deeper freeze or for many days, tent with stakes and cover tree with plastic to create a tent of warm air, don't let the plastic touch the tree that defeats the purpose of insulating the tree against the cold.
"

Thank you Alison for some interesting hints and tips, I will have a go with them and I'm sure others will too. See the Growing Your Own page for other tips on growing Redwoods.

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