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Giant Redwood near the Treetop walk Coast Redwood near the Treetop walk
Among the young trees that have been planted near the Treetop Walkway in Kew Gardens are a Giant and a Coast Redwood.
The Giant Redwood stands near the base of the stairs and lift, growing beside a large fallen tree trunk, and is almost 4 metres high.
The Coast Redwood is nearly 2.5 metres high and is leaning rather badly in January 2010, hopefully this will be straightened before it gets much taller.

A nearby plaque states: "This is a coastal redwood (Sequoia sempervirens), the tallest living things on Earth. The biggest stretch 115m into the sky - can you imagine climbing six and a half times higher than Kew's Xstrata Treetop Walkway?"

Coast Redwood

Coast Redwood
Throughout the grounds at Kew there are solitary Redwood trees and some in pairs or groups of three.

A young Giant Redwood planted in the middle of the Redwood Grove

Ornamental Pheasants roaming among the Redwood trees
In the Redwood grove there is a mixture of all three types of Redwoods of differing ages.
The largest Giant Redwood measured in the grove, and in the whole of the gardens, had a girth of 4.83m and its height was 34.8m in January 2010.
Dawn Redwood (Mexican Cyprus across the lake) Dawn Redwood by the lake
Around the lake there are several Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptosroboides), including some young ones that appear to be recently planted, and also a Mexican Cyprus (Taxodium mucronatum) is growing by the bridge. It was holding onto its golden orange foliage to give a stunning display in the winter sun in January.

A Swamp Cyprus and a Wollemi Pine on an island in the lake
There are four or five Wollemi Pine (Wollemia nobilis) on the island in the middle of the lake and you can see one on the righthand side of the above photograph. Another couple stand near the Orangery Restaurant, one is in a veritable fortress of a steel cage. This ancient surviving tree has the appearance of what might be the result if you could cross a Redwood with a Monkey Puzzle (Araucaria araucana) tree!

The "knees" of the Swamp Cyprus (Taxodium distichum) can be seen either side at the base of the larger tree in the above photograph. These are part of the root system that grow upwards to enable the roots to breathe in very swampy conditions.

Although the Swamp Cyprus is a deciduous pine that is very similar to the Dawn Redwood, this is one of the ways of telling them apart because the Dawn Redwood does not produce "knees".

Dawn Redwood: opposing needles
The needles are another way to tell the difference. The picture on the right shows that the needles of a Swamp Cyprus are alternate along the stem.

By comparison, the picture on the left is that of Dawn Redwood foliage where the needles are on opposite sides along the stem.

(The colour of the foliage will vary depending on the time of year).

Swamp Cyprus: alternate needles

A Peacock by the lake
An Ornamental Pheasant Dawn Redwood as twilight approaches
Kew Gardens has been a place that was on the list to visit for quite some time, and it certainly did not disappoint. As might be expected, there are some great walks through a garden that offers an enormous variety of plants both outside and inside its great glasshouses.

Peacocks and Ornamental Pheasants are among the many birds that frequent the gardens and Kew boasts that it has the largest compost heap in the world!
Allow plenty of time to explore the gardens, a whole day is still not enough. There is the Kew Explorer bus if you prefer a drive around the perimeter and there are several stops where you may alight. The bus passes through the Redwood Grove and the guide could be heard to describe the Redwoods as "lovely trees." (No surprise there!)

The Temperate House

Common Names and Latin Name No. Latitude and Longitude OS National Grid Elevation
(above sea-level)
Height Girth Date Measured
WGS84 OSGB36
Giant Redwood
Sequoiadendron giganteum
1 N51.47541
W0.29789
N51.47490
W0.29633
TQ 18306 76534 34ft
(10.37m)
3.9m 0.17m Jan 2010
Coast Redwood
Sequoia sempervirens
2 N51.47585
W0.29761
N51.47534
W0.29605
TQ 18325 76584 67ft
(20.43m)
2.45m -- Jan 2010
3 N51.47622
W0.29832
N51.47571
W0.29676
TQ 18274 76624 16ft
(04.88m)
28.2m 3.22m Jan 2010
4 N51.47617
W0.29818
N51.47566
W0.29662
TQ 18284 76618 17ft
(05.18m)
28m 3.29m Jan 2010
5 N51.47337
W0.29835
N51.47286
W0.29679
TQ 18280 76307 21ft
(06.40m)
25.6m 3.07m Jan 2010
Giant Redwood
Sequoiadenron giganteum
6 N51.47355
W0.30075
N51.47304
W0.29919
TQ 18112 76323 26ft
(07.93m)
-- -- --
Giant Redwood
Sequoiadendron giganteum
7 N51.47362
W0.30088
N51.47311
W0.29932
TQ 18103 76330 47ft
(14.33m)
34.8m 4.83m Jan 2010
Coast Redwood
Sequoia sempervirens
8 N51.47374
W0.29695
N51.47323
W0.29539
TQ 18376 76350 34ft
(10.37m)
22.2m 2.88m Jan 2010
Giant Redwood
Sequoiadendron giganteum
9 N51.47652
W0.29981
N51.47601
W0.29825
TQ 18170 76655 29ft
(08.84m)
34.1m 4.5m Jan 2010
10 N51.47608
W0.30027
N51.47557
W0.29871
TQ 18139 76605 19ft
(05.79m)
26.7m 3.45m Jan 2010
11 N51.47601
W0.30036
N51.47550
W0.2988
TQ 18133 76597 19ft
(05.79m)
23.3m 2.76m Jan 2010
12 N51.47603
W0.30043
N51.47552
W0.29887
TQ 18128 76599 11ft
(03.35m)
20.9m 2.87m Jan 2010
Dawn Redwood
Metasequoia glyptostrobodies
13 N51.47604
W0.30139
N51.47553
W0.29983
TQ 18062 76599 12ft
(03.66m)
18.8m 3.05m Jan 2010
14 N51.47623
W0.30261
N51.47572
W0.30105
TQ 17976 76618 19ft
(05.79m)
2.62m -- Jan 2010
15 N51.47625
W0.30267
N51.47574
W0.30111
TQ 17972 76620 12ft
(03.66m)
17.3m 2.01m Jan 2010
16 N51.47627
W0.30258
N51.47576
W0.30102
TQ 17978 76622 3ft
(00.91m)
2.02m -- Jan 2010
17 N51.47670
W0.29956
N51.47619
W0.298
TQ 18187 76675 6ft
(01.83m)
12.4m 2.1m Jan 2010
18 N51.48330
W0.29084
N51.48279
W0.28928
TQ 18776 77423 22ft
(06.71m)
10.8m -- Jan 2010
Girth was measured at 1.5m from ground.
This list does not include all of the Redwoods in the Redwood Grove.

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